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Awe-inspiring images, NASA, and STEAM

The recent images captured by the James Webb Space Telescope are absolutely awe inspiring. As works of natural art, the scenery we are now privileged to see serve as a reminder, at least for this librarian, that we are such a small part of a very grand universe. They also serve as one of coolest examples of government information. Or, rather government shared information as no one owns the universe.

an undulating, translucent star-forming region in the Carina Nebula is shown in this Webb image, hued in ambers and blues; foreground stars with diffraction spikes can be seen, as can a speckling of background points of light through the cloudy nebula

As these amazing discoveries are shared in our media it calls to mind the resources made available specifically for libraries to help bring STEAM to all. NASA at My Library (previous Hitchhiker post) is a collaborative effort of ALA, NASA, public, and state libraries to do just that. Here are some tools that you can use to enhance STEAM at your library:

NASA@ My Library is a STEM education initiative created to increase and enhance STEAM learning opportunities for library patrons throughout the nation, including geographic areas and populations currently underrepresented in STEAM education. https://www.ala.org/tools/programming/nasalibraries 

Through the NASA@ My Library project, NASA, public libraries, and state library agencies work together to increase and enhance STEM learning opportunities for millions of library patrons throughout the nation, including geographic areas and populations that are currently underserved in STEM education.https://science.nasa.gov/science-activation-team/nasa-at-my-library 

The STAR Library Network (STAR Net) is a hands-on learning network for libraries and their communities across the country. STAR Net focuses on helping library professionals build their STEM skills by providing “science-technology activities and resources” (STAR) and training to use those resources.https://www.starnetlibraries.org/about/our-projects/nasa-at-my-library/

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) program is designed to provide access to Agency documents through a citizen-centered service using a results-oriented FOIA program. https://www.nasa.gov/content/nasa-e-libraries

If you are in or find yourself in Southern New Mexico these places will help further your research:

NMSL, UNM, and NMSU share responsibility for different areas of the Federal Depository Library Program. Though NMSL has a small colletion of NASA publications, NMSU houses older and continues to collect current publications coming from NASA. Search their catalog and see if you might find something of interst for you or your patrons.

The New Mexico Museum of Space History in Alamogordo is a division of the New Mexico Department of Cultural Affairs, under the leadership of the Governor’s Commission to the New Mexico Museum of Space History. Programs and exhibits are supported by the International Space Hall of Fame Foundation through the generous support of donors. https://www.nmspacemuseum.org/

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